unemployment insurance

Tax Saving Strategies for Small Businesses And Real Estate Agents: A Seminar

MyCorporation and Paychex are sponsoring a seminar on February 4th that will tell you everything you need to know about saving on taxes. Here’s everything you’ll learn:

  • Legal strategies and techniques you can start using right away to reduce your annual tax liability.
  • Find out how forming a corporation or LLC can help you protect your personal assets and reduce your risk of an IRS audit.
  • The benefits of obtaining an outside payroll company to compensate your employees.
  • How to keep more of what you earn each year and save thousand over the lifetime of your business.
  • How you can utilize the Internal Revenue Code advantageously while not crossing the line.
  • Plus, stay for networking opportunities after the seminar!

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annual meeting

Business Basics: Annual Meeting for Small Corporations

Corporate meetings aren’t exactly fun; they’re tied to board rooms, suits, and a lot of financial talk. And so smaller corporations – especially those with just a handful of shareholders – often ask whether they really have to hold a meeting every, single year to effectively rubber-stamp the same board of directors and file their annual report. The answer, of course, is yes. Annual shareholder meetings are legally required for private and public corporations, regardless of size. But your annual meeting doesn’t have to be a stodgy affair. In fact, one of the best parts about being a smaller corporation is the extra little bit of freedom you have in how these meetings are run.

Forget the Board Rooms and Offices

You have to set the date of your annual shareholder meeting in your bylaws, but the location is up to you. Plenty of corporations opt for the traditional, formal meeting – everyone gathers in the office, there’s a podium, people wear suits, and everything is very cut and dry. But what if you run your business from home, as nearly half of all small business owners do? Or what if you want your annual meeting to be a bit more enjoyable? There’s absolutely nothing wrong with meeting at a restaurant, or around your kitchen table. In fact, we’ve talked to plenty of CEOs who make their annual meeting a potluck; the few shareholders they have all bring a dish, they sit down, do their formal meeting, and then spend the rest of the day eating and talking. Some states actually do set a minimum for the number of shareholders that must be present, so hosting a more laid-back meeting can help ensure people do come.

Have the agenda laid out and ready to go

The chair can technically “wing” the meeting if they have a good idea as to what needs to be voted on. Normally these meetings are to appoint and/or remove directors, modify corporate bylaws, vote on shareholder initiatives, and approve transactions requiring shareholder approval like mergers or asset sales. But it’s a better idea to list out what, exactly, needs to be brought up so you can keep the formal part of the meeting as quick and easy as possible. Different states may also require different numbers of votes depending on the transaction – sometimes a simple majority is not enough – so planning this out lets you know what numbers you actually need.

Keep your minutes light

You must keep the minutes of your annual meeting, but you do not have to transcribe every, single thing said. Note the date, time, and place of the meeting, take attendance, lay out the agenda, and record votes. If anything new is brought up during the meeting, make sure to note that as well. Otherwise, your minutes can effectively be a quick sketch of your annual meeting. Just make sure, before everyone leaves, you pass around the minutes so everyone can review them. These constitute an official document and it’s important they portray the meeting accurately.

Every corporation must host an annual meeting for its shareholders, but there’s no reason why it has to be this dreaded, boring affair. Corporations, especially those with just a handful of shareholders, have a bit of leeway as to what the meeting will actually look like. Set out the agenda, keep minutes, and vote, but feel free to make this a meeting of friends, as well as a meeting for the shareholders.

Have any questions about corporate governance? Want to form your own corporation but not sure where to start? Click here for a free consultation, or give us a call at 1-877-692-6772 and we will be happy to answer any questions you may have!

 

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Money3_small

MyCorporation’s End-of-Year S-Corp, Payroll Promotion

With the end of the year approaching, entrepreneurs everywhere are reflecting back on a year of business decisions. What worked? What didn’t? How can I really get the ball rolling for 2016? For those new small business owners out there who have yet to incorporate, we have a suggestion. The S-Corporation. Why? Because the payroll benefits are undeniable. (more…)

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delayed filing

Business Basics: Should You Opt for a Delayed Filing?

Procrastination tends to hit business owners hard when it comes to incorporating or forming an LLC. A lot of small business owners resolve to file the necessary paperwork, and then never do. And now they’re facing the end of another year and wondering if it’s even worth filing this late in the game. Believe it or not, it is! But around this time of the year, we usually tell customers to consider a delayed filing over a traditional, immediate action. Delayed filings are the perfect option for businesses owners who know…

They want to form an LLC or Corporation

Forming a limited liability company or incorporating is easily on of the best ways to protect yourself and your personal assets from any debts associated with the business. The government treats corporations and LLCs as their own legal entities, separate from the owner or owners. Any debts it incurs, loans it takes out, or judgments against it are therefore its responsibility and, in most cases, your personal assets will not be seized to pay for those debts. However, forming an LLC or incorporating requires the company’s managers to jump through a few extra loopholes, like paying fees and filing reports annually. Incorporate or form an LLC now, and you may be on the hook for 2015’s fees, even though the company only existed for a month. Plus, depending on your state, you may have to file different returns for the months your business was not its own entity, and the month it was.

That’s where delayed filing comes in. A delayed filing allows you to file the proper paperwork now, and set an “effective on” date a month or so into the future. That way you finish out this year as a sole proprietorship or partnership and, early next year, your LLC or Incorporation is officially approved and formed.

They do not want to be rushed

There is a lot of work that needs to be done at the end of the year. You have to put your books in order, evaluate the staff, and make it through the holiday season. But forming a legal business entity comes with its fair share of responsibilities as well; if you rush through your paperwork, and anything is amiss, the state will reject your filing. We are right at the cusp of December, so take this brief bit of time to make sure your ducks are all in a row – you have a registered agent, a physical address, and a protected DBA name – and then fill out your forms and opt for a delayed filing. That way you won’t have to struggle through all of the normal, extra work that comes in December and January.

They don’t mind waiting a little bit

I know how frustrating it can be to wait on the government to approve your paperwork, but trust me, patience pays off. You actually save a bit of time filing now and opting for a delayed filing instead of filing at the beginning of next year because a lot of businesses wait until the start of the year to send in their forms. State offices get swamped, the delay gets longer, and then you’re stuck waiting until February or March to hear whether your LLC or Corporation was formed. A delayed filing means your paperwork is approved before that rush or, at the very least, that the state will put your paperwork at the top of next year’s pile.

Ready to form an LLC or Corporation? Want us to help you file the right paperwork or opt for a delayed filing? Click here or give us a call at 1-877-692-6772

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Business Basics: Should an Independent Contractor Form an LLC?

Independent, or 1099, contractors run their own businesses. A properly classified independent contractor is allowed to set their own hours, decide from where to work, and are allowed to negotiate payment. When you work as a 1099 contractor, you have to think of the businesses who you do work for as your clients, rather than your employer. independent contractorAnd as a small business owner, an independent contractor should treat his or her work like any other entrepreneur would, and that includes considering the formation of a separate business entity. So should 1099 contractors form an LLC? That all depends on their personal situation, but there are some great benefits to it.

Fewer Misclassification Concerns

The state has cracked down heavily on 1099 misclassification after years of erroneous assumptions as to what employers could and couldn’t expect from an independent contractor. Employers had been using the 1099 designator to keep employees from earning the wages and having the protections required by law. (more…)

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Start Your Business Today for Half-Off

shutterstock_134435315_smallApril 15th isn’t anyone’s favorite day; tax day typically brings on a feeling of dread, but we wanted to give you something to look forward to this year! In honor of tax day, we are offering our basic package for half the price. That means you get the formation of an LLC or Corporation, normally priced at $69, for half the price!

Whether you’ve been thinking about starting a business for as long as you can remember or have only recently begun tossing around the idea, now is your chance!

All you need is the code: TAXDAYDEAL

Give us a call at 1-877-692-6772, or visit our website at www.MyCorporation.com to start your business today!

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MyCorp FAQS: Can I Be My Own Registered Agent?

The short answer – yes. But, regardless, it may still be a good idea to hire someone else to be your registered agent. Registered agents exist because of due process. When you turn your business into its own, separate legal entity by forming an LLC or incorporating, you’re effectively giving it a right to due process. registered agentThat means, before a lawsuit can go forward, your business must be properly notified. A registered agent, then, is the point of contact for notifying your business about impending lawsuits.

However, many states use a business’s registered agent as a contact point for other important matters. They’ll send state documents, franchise tax forms, and other reminders to the company’s registered agent, rather than to the company itself, since reaching an established point of contact is a pretty reliable way of getting in touch with the business.

For a nominal fee, you can appoint someone to be that point of contact.

So why wouldn’t you want to be your own registered agent? Acting as your own registered agent will save money, but there are downsides to that choice. For one, a registered agent must have a physical address within the state the company was formed in. So if you formed and do business in a state other than your own, you have to designate someone in that state as a registered agent.

Further, registered agents are the contact point for sensitive matters like lawsuits or summons. Having a registered agent outside your company keeps the office from panicking, like they would if you were served in your own office.

And finally, your registered agent is going to get a lot of important paperwork. It’s their job to keep track of what they receive, and send it along to you. When you run a business, it’s easy to overlook or forget about things like annual reports and fees. A registered agent will really help you from losing track of that important paperwork.

You – or in some states, your business – can act as the registered agent. Or you can hire an outside agency. Just be sure, regardless of what path you choose to follow, that your registered agent is dependable and discreet.

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MyCorp FAQs: Should I file in a state with no income tax?

This is easily one of the most commonly asked questions we get. Each state has different rules and regulations when it comes to income tax. Most have both, some don’t collect personal income tax, and a few don’t college corporate income tax. And to a new business owner forming a corporation, forming in a state without a corporate income tax might sound awesome! income taxAfter all, who likes paying taxes?

Unfortunately, things aren’t that cut and dry, and there are good reasons why so many business owners opt to stay in the state that they do business.

You can form a corporation in another state

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How MyCorporation Helps Franchises

Recently we’ve started exploring an often over-looked sector of American small business – franchises. Franchising is a major part of our economy, accounting for 4-5% of the country’s GDP, according to the IFA. It’s also a great way for people to be their own boss and open a business, without having to start from scratch. FranchiseA misconception amongst would-be franchisors, however, is that they’ll get everything they need from the main-office. While that’s partly true, there are a lot of ways MyCorp can help franchisors.

We act as another level of support

When you buy into a franchise, you usually get three things from the head office – a right to use its name, access to its system of success, and some assistance when you first start out. (more…)

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MyCorp is Teaming up with Provident Trust Group

Why settle for less when you can have more?PTG

MyCorporation is teaming up with Provident Trust Group to help business owners take advantage of all the benefits Solo 401(k)s and Solo 401(k) LLCs have to offer. Provident Trust Group is an IRA Custodian. They currently establish accounts for nearly 200 business owners monthly which has led them to a client base of more than 20,000. They’ve even landed on Inc.’s 500|5000 list of fastest-growing private companies four years in a row. (more…)

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