unemployment insurance

Business Basics: State Unemployment Insurance

Unemployment insurance, at its root, is pretty easy to understand – it’s just a program meant to protect workers that become involuntarily unemployed. But because it is run on a hybrid state-federal system, and is often calculated based on weird variables like experience ratings, the entire concept quickly becomes muddled. Most states also change rates and maximum taxable wages on a year-by-year basis, so what was paid last year may not be the same this year. Thankfully, as long as you learn a little bit about unemployment programs and stay on top of those annual changes, UI shouldn’t cause too many problems. (more…)

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unemployment insurance

Tax Saving Strategies for Small Businesses And Real Estate Agents: A Seminar

MyCorporation and Paychex are sponsoring a seminar on February 4th that will tell you everything you need to know about saving on taxes. Here’s everything you’ll learn:

  • Legal strategies and techniques you can start using right away to reduce your annual tax liability.
  • Find out how forming a corporation or LLC can help you protect your personal assets and reduce your risk of an IRS audit.
  • The benefits of obtaining an outside payroll company to compensate your employees.
  • How to keep more of what you earn each year and save thousand over the lifetime of your business.
  • How you can utilize the Internal Revenue Code advantageously while not crossing the line.
  • Plus, stay for networking opportunities after the seminar!

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Business Basics: Should an Independent Contractor Form an LLC?

Independent, or 1099, contractors run their own businesses. A properly classified independent contractor is allowed to set their own hours, decide from where to work, and are allowed to negotiate payment. When you work as a 1099 contractor, you have to think of the businesses who you do work for as your clients, rather than your employer. independent contractorAnd as a small business owner, an independent contractor should treat his or her work like any other entrepreneur would, and that includes considering the formation of a separate business entity. So should 1099 contractors form an LLC? That all depends on their personal situation, but there are some great benefits to it.

Fewer Misclassification Concerns

The state has cracked down heavily on 1099 misclassification after years of erroneous assumptions as to what employers could and couldn’t expect from an independent contractor. Employers had been using the 1099 designator to keep employees from earning the wages and having the protections required by law. (more…)

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How to Determine Your Home Office Qualifies for a Tax Deduction

What are your tax obligations as an independent contractor?

Over the past couple of years, controversy rose around independent contractors. The line between employee and independent contractor has thinned, and many are confused over how workers should be classified. In general, the independent contractor is considered to self-employed, and the company is their client. This means that there are some vast differences between the tax obligations for independent contractors and employees.

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MyCorp FAQs: Does my Online Business Have to Collect Sales Tax?

All businesses pay a federal income tax, whether its as its own entity or through the income tax of the owner. But, sales tax is a completely different story. Sales tax is determined by each individual state and the requirements for multiple state businesses are often complicated. sales taxThose requirements get further complex when you are an online business as you may not have any physical presence in the state itself. Whether or not your online business has to pay sales tax all depends on the states’ definition of one word: nexus.

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MyCorp FAQs: How do I start collecting payroll taxes?

The IRS, nearly every state tax agency, and even some cities require employers to withhold a certain amount from their employee’s paychecks to cover income tax, social security, and medicare obligations. payroll taxesThese are payroll taxes, and it’s your responsibility, as a small business owner, to collect and send them in. The amount varies from state to state, and in some cases city to city, but there are three main steps to collection.

Calculate
Everyone you hire fills out a W-4, which gives you some basic information like family size and other deductions. (more…)

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MyCorp FAQs: Do I Have to Send in Estimated Tax Payments?

Estimated tax payments are a pretty straightforward topic. You probably remember that, back when you worked for someone else, you had your taxes taken out of your paycheck. You don’t get out of having to pay tax when you start your own business – the IRS still expects you to pay what you owe. But what if you’re just starting out and not making much money? estimated tax paymentOr you’ve had a bad quarter and don’t have the money to cover what you normally send in? Do you still have to send in your estimated tax payment?

If you expect to owe more than $1,000, then you very likely have to pay estimated taxes. (more…)

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MyCorp FAQs: Do I Need an Employer Identification Number?

An Employer Identification Number, also called an EIN or a Federal Tax Identification Number , is a unique set of digits assigned to a business by the IRS. With it, tax agencies can easily track the financial activity of your company, and make sure that you pay your taxes. employer identification numberBut, if you run a sole-proprietorship, the IRS can already do that using your personal social security number. So in what cases do you need an Employer Identification Number?

When you hire someone

The only time you can really get away with using your social security number is when your business is considered a sole-proprietorship, and you’re the only employee. The IRS figures, in cases like that, the company’s profit flows directly to you, and you pay your taxes from that. But that changes the minute you bring anyone on to help run the company, and that includes a business partner. Once you start hiring, your company must have an EIN.

When you form an LLC or Incorporate

Incorporating or forming an LLC separates you and the business. (more…)

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2015 Tax Stats: An Infographic

April 15th is just around the corner, and the buzz word on everyone’s mind is “taxes!” We’ve gathered tax statistics from far and wide to give you our latest infographic: “2015 Tax Statistics.” From the states that receive the most revenue from sales tax, to tax rates by country, we walk you through this year’s must-know tax facts.

taxstats2015_new

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MyCorp FAQs: Should I file in a state with no income tax?

This is easily one of the most commonly asked questions we get. Each state has different rules and regulations when it comes to income tax. Most have both, some don’t collect personal income tax, and a few don’t college corporate income tax. And to a new business owner forming a corporation, forming in a state without a corporate income tax might sound awesome! income taxAfter all, who likes paying taxes?

Unfortunately, things aren’t that cut and dry, and there are good reasons why so many business owners opt to stay in the state that they do business.

You can form a corporation in another state

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