Business Basics: S-Corporations

Incorporation is one of our specialties, and many of our clients come to us because they want to incorporate their business. After all, incorporation helps protect you in the event of a lawsuit, and forming a separate business entity helps separate the company’s debts from your private assets. However, our customers also often ask us about a real caveat to incorporation – double taxation. After you incorporate, your business has to pay a tax on any income that it earns, subject to the federal and state corporate income tax rates. On top of that, you still have to pay tax on income you earn from working for the corporation. Effectively, this taxes the same amount of income twice, and that heavy burden frightens many small business owners, most of whom don’t have much extra capital to throw around. There is, happily, a way to avoid double taxation, and it is the subject of our Business Basics post for this week – filing for S-Corporation status.

S-Corporation

Chapter 1, Subchapter S of the Internal Revenue Code allows smaller businesses to avoid paying federal, and usually state, corporate income tax. S-Corporations are the most popular type of corporation in the United States, with 61.9% of all active corporations filing Form 1120S to apply for S-Corp status.

In order to qualify, your corporation must have fewer than 100 shareholders and issue only one class of stock. If your corporation qualifies, you can file for S-Corp status, which will allow any income earned by the corporation to pass through the business, untaxed, directly to the shareholders. You, of course, still have to pay your personal income taxes, and by law must take a reasonable compensation as a wage. But your corporate income, in most cases, will stay untouched.

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7 Invoicing Best Practices for Small Business Owners

7 Invoicing Best Practices for Small Business OwnersThis guest post is brought to you by GoDaddy Online Bookkeeping (formerly Outright) the simplest way to manage your small business finances online. Sign up today for a less taxing tax time!

Running a business only works if you get paid. Sending out invoices with no answer from the client or customer can cause you to pull your hair out and stay up all night wondering how you’re going to pay the bills.

Now that GoDaddy Online Bookkeeping also includes a new Invoicing feature, we’ve taken a marked interest in how our customers invoice. And we’ve come up with several best practices that seem to get invoices paid promptly and in full.

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The Best Insurance Type for Your Small Business

By Katherine Wood, HomeownersInsurance.com

Unexpected events, even seemingly minor ones, could hit your small business much harder than you expect. That’s why you need to protect your hard work by purchasing the right type and amount of insurance. For a new small business owner, the insurance landscape can be difficult to navigate.

Here’s a guide to the basic requirements and other options available for safeguarding your successes.

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Business Basics: How to Successfully Run a Non-Profit Corporation

Studious readers of our MyCorp blog may recall that, back in June, we covered non-profit corporations in a ‘Business Basics’ post, and answered a few simple questions like what a non-profit corporation was and how to form one. This week, we felt it would be a good idea to tackle one of the most often asked questions about non-profits – how do you run a successful non-profit corporation? Now, it’s impossible to distill what makes a non-profit successful into a 700 word post, but we can point out a few things you can do to help your non-profit succeed.

Draft, and adhere to, a solid mission statement
When you form a non-profit corporation, you have to clearly identify your mission. What, exactly, do you hope to accomplish with this organization? Who do you hope to help? What type of a vision do you have?  You may have a few fuzzy answers to these questions running through your head, but you have to absolutely solidify every idea and goal you have before you ever hope to begin raising money. If your ‘elevator pitch’ is a jumbled mess of ideals with no, clear, actionable goals, no one will want to donate to your non-profit. The IRS will also review your mission statement when they decide whether or not to grant your group tax-exempt status.

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Business Basics: How to Run a Benefit Corporation

No, you aren’t having Déjà vu - we’ve done a business basics on B-Corps before. However, we decided to revisit the benefit corporation because there are still so many question surrounding the new structure. In just a few short months, eight more states have enacted legislation to recognize benefit corporation, bringing the total up to twenty, if you include D.C. And, as more and more people weigh the pros and cons of forming a B-Corp, the inevitable question of ‘how do you even run one of these things?’ is bound to come up. Happily, running a B-Corp isn’t much different than running any other type of corporation.

Benefit Corporations: Part Two!


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Business Basics: Why Do You Even Need an EIN?

An Employer Identification Number, or EIN for short, is basically a social security number for your business. Like with social security numbers, the IRS uses EINs to track what businesses need to certain types of tax. However, not all businesses are technically required to have an EIN as sole proprietorships can be identified by the owner’s SSN instead. That doesn’t mean, though, that you should avoid filing for one, as there are three main reasons why obtaining an EIN is important for a small business.

It allows the business to hire employees.

If you run a sole-proprietorship and you are the only employee that works for the business, all of the profits and losses are going to be reported as part of your personal income. You then pay whatever state and federal taxes you need to, just like you would if you received an income from anywhere else. However, when you hire an employee, you are responsible for withholding any necessary taxes from that employee’s income. The IRS then cannot simply use your SSN to keep track of what they are owed as there are now two different employees, and that’s where the employer identification number comes in. EINs let the IRS and other tax-collecting bodies know what businesses need to be sending in the usual payroll taxes.
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Y is for… Yikes, I forgot to Incorporate!

All new entrepreneurs have the choice of incorporating or not. By not incorporating, you’ll get out of some hefty paperwork, though you’ll be missing out on some great benefits that come along with incorporating your business. If you are a small business owner and you haven’t gotten around to incorporating yet, here’s what you’re subjecting your business to:

A lack of trust from customers.

Your customers want to know they are giving their business to a legitimate, professional establishment. Having an Inc. or LLC at the end of your business’s name helps make your customers feel comfortable with you. Without it, you may receive some skepticism.
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How LLCs are Structured and Taxed

By Greg Lindberg, 1800Accountant.com Writer

Before you receive the hard-earned title of being a newly crowned business owner, you must weigh the different types of business entities available to you. Each entity is designed uniquely when it comes to how the IRS treats it. Considering the tax obligations that apply to each entity is a must to make a wise business decision. 1800Accountant.com, one of MyCorporation’s partners, offers a few pointers to consider on how LLCs are structured and taxed.
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Business Basics: Professional Corporations

Welcome to our weekly business basics post! This week we decided to explore a specialized legal entity called a professional corporation (PC). Now most of those who know a little bit about corporate law probably know that there are two, main types of corporations – S-Corps, and C-Corps. But in addition to these, there are a few other specialized structures that are important to keep under the belt of a small business, like the professional corporation.

So what is a professional corporation?
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