TAX BENEFITS AND BUSINESS ENTITIES

The standard “corporation” format used by businesses to protect personal assets and minimize personal liability can also include other types of business entities, including S-Corporations and Limited Liability Companies (“LLC”).  The corporation is America’s most popular and oldest form of business entity. However, with the tax advantages of Limited Liability Companies and S-Corporations, other types of business entities are quickly becoming more popular. 

 Limited Liability Companies 

An LLC combines the limited liability shield traditionally associated with corporations, the structural and financial flexibility of partnerships, and the tax benefits of “pass-through” taxation. As a pass-through entity, the LLC pays no income tax. Instead, items of taxable income, gain, loss, and deduction pass through the LLC to its owners, and are reported by them on their separate income tax returns. Similar to the corporation, an LLC is recognized as a separate legal entity from its “members.” Thus, an LLC can own property and commit itself to contractual obligations.

 IRS Treatment of the One-Member LLC 

An LLC with only one member/owner is automatically considered to be a sole proprietorship unless an election is made to be treated as a corporation via IRS Form 8832. Thus, the sole member of an LLC will file Form 1040  (U.S. Individual Income Tax Return), and will include Form 1040, SCHEDULE C (Profit or Loss from Business) with his/her tax returns.

 

Regardless of how many members the LLC has, the LLC may file an Election to be Treated as a Corporation for Purposes of Taxation (IRS Form 8832). If an election is made to be treated as a corporation, the LLC must file Form 1120 (U.S. Corporation Income Tax Return).

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With the S-Corporation Deadline Quickly Approaching…Should I Consider filing for S-Corporation Status?

This year’s deadline for electing S-Corporation status is approaching fast -  March 15, 2008.Now’s the time to consider whether your corporation should elect “S-Corporation” status. Let’s First Start off with Explaining What an S-Corporation is….An S-Corporation begins its existence as a general, for-profit corporation upon the filing of Articles of Incorporation at the appropriate state office. Once formed, a general for-profit corporation that has not requested “S-Corporation Status” with the IRS will be required to pay income tax on taxable income generated by the corporation. In addition, any dividends distributed to shareholders may be subject to taxation as dividend income to that shareholder as well (hence the problem of “double taxation” that can occur in a ‘Non-S-Corporation’). However, after the corporation has been formed, it may elect “S-Corporation Status” by timely submitting IRS form 2553 to the Internal Revenue Service. Certain states require that your corporation file state-specific forms to qualify for S-Corporation status in that state for state taxation purposes. In addition, S-Corporation status is not available for purposes of state tax liability in certain states. Please contact your state’s taxing authority for further information.Once this filing is complete, the S-Corporation is taxed in a manner similar to a sole proprietorship or partnership, rather than as a separate entity. Thus, the income is “passed-through” to the shareholders for purposes of computing tax liability. Therefore, each shareholder’s individual tax return will report the income or loss generated by the S-Corporation.

Who typically elects S-Corporation status?Most entrepreneurs prefer the S-Corporation structure for the following reasons: ·          The S-Corporation combines many of the advantages of the sole proprietorship, the partnership, the corporation, and the LLC into one entity.·          Unlike sole proprietors and partners in a partnership, shareholders of an S-Corporation are afforded the same level of limited liability and personal asset protection as are the shareholders of a general, for-profit corporation.·          In an S-Corporation, shareholders avoid the “double-taxation” common to shareholders of non-S-Corporations because all income or loss in an S-Corporation is reported only one time on the personal income tax returns of the S-Corporation’s shareholders. Where a corporation claims income from a passive investment (e.g. from real estate owned) for three consecutive years that exceeds 25% of the corporation’s gross receipts, S-Corporation status may be terminated by the IRS. Most real estate investors, for example, prefer placing real property in an LLC (Limited Liability Company) rather than an S-Corporation for this very reason Continue reading