Should Your Business Buy or Lease a Company Car?

Should Your Business Buy or Lease a Company Car?When it comes to obtaining a company vehicle, you have a couple of options available to your business – you can opt to either buy or lease. Let’s examine these options in detail.

Buying a car

If you decide to buy a car, keep taxes in mind. Writing off the costs on your taxes can be done in two ways – actual costs or mileage – and there are limits on how much you can take in a given year. If you choose actual costs, you have to do that every year you claim the vehicle; you cannot change your mind later. There are different amounts you can write off depending on the type of vehicle you own, too, whether it is an electric car or an SUV. If you’re looking to invest in a hybrid vehicle for your business, be sure to keep in mind that it will no longer qualify for a tax break.

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Should You Give Your Employees a Second Chance?

I’ve always believed that my business’s success hinges on the open and honest relationship I have with my team. I have to trust that my employees will do the job they were hired to do so I can focus on running and growing the company. However, I have unfortunately had to deal with members of my team breaking that trust in the past. And, while you should always consider giving people a second chance at the workplace, second chances also mean you should look at what they did, and determine whether what happened was a minor transgression, or a serious breach of trust. second chance

Look at the big picture

It can be really easy to focus too heavily on the employee when making this sort of decision, but you need to consider a lot of different factors. Firing someone can leave a long-lasting impact on your business, especially if other employees don’t agree with your decision. Was this betrayal of trust more personal, or professional? Occasionally we have to swallow our personal pride for the betterment of the company, and objectivity is key to making this sort of a decision. If this is an isolated incident, then maybe a second chance is in order.

Consider the impact on your business

If this employee has proven themselves to the company and has spent years working within it, firing them could hurt your business. So you need to ask yourself if the employee’s separation will actually be good for the company. Do they contribute to inter-office harmony? Are they replaceable? Will their absence help or hinder day to day operations? Being slighted by someone you trust is always a jarring experience, but it isn’t worth sacrificing your team’s dynamic to make a point. But if this employee did actually harm the company, it may be worth sending them out the door for good.

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Business Basics: Trade Dress

This week we thought it’d be a good idea to look at one of the most important parts of a product’s branding, its trade dress. You are affected by trade dress every single day, whether you realize it or not. If we describe a white coffee cup with a green circle on it, you’ll know it’s from Starbucks. Or if we show you a bag with a red square and yellow arches, you’ll think McDonalds. Essentially, trade dress is the various characteristics that make up a product’s or package’s appearance. But how do you protect your own trade dress? And does building a brand mean marrying that packaging?

Trade Dress

We bet you still know what company this is.

Why should you build trade dress recognition?
Because your company needs a way to immediately distinguish itself. Your brand embodies all of the goodwill and trust you’ve built into your company, and something as simple as a color, font, or even the shape of your product’s box can evoke all of those feelings within whatever customer is looking at your product. That’s why you want your trade dress to be consistent over all of your properties. Your logo, signage, site, and product packaging should all be built around some common element that inextricably ties your business with your product or service.

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Introducing MyBizWiz – Our New Entity Choice Wizard!

MyBizWiz, MyCorp’s new business entity wizard, was created to help answer one of our customers’ most commonly asked questions; ‘What type of business entity should I form?’ There are plenty of different factors that need to be considered before making that final plunge. How many people run the business? What sort business is it? Do you have personal assets you’d like to protect?

Introducing MyBizWiz - Our New Entity Choice Wizard!

In order to help new small business owners navigate the often confusing world of legal business entities, MyCorporation chose to build the new MyBizWiz tool. All you have to do is answer a few simple questions about your business, and our entity-choosing wizard will tell you what type of business entity would suit you best. It also gives you a general description of that entity and runs down the basic benefits behind it.

To get started, just click here and answer a few questions. There are no obligations, and we don’t ask for any personal information – MyBizWiz is here to help you choose the best type of business entity for your company!

We’re happy happy to answer any questions you might have about MyBizWiz -give us a call at 1 (877) 692-6772!

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50 States of Incorporation: North Dakota

North Dakota is easily one of America’s most intriguing states. It was fairly unaffected by the Great Recession, and has one of the lowest unemployment rates of any state. North Dakota is also the only state with a state-run bank, the Bank of North Dakota , and a state-run flour mill, the North Dakota Mill and Elevator, which is also the largest flour mill in the USA.  incorporate in North Dakota Both of these institutions are carryovers of the Nonpartisan League, a populist political party that did so well in North Dakota that it gave the state a three-party system before eventually merging with the Democrats. North Dakota is also the reason we have a National Park system – its natural beauty inspired Theodore Roosevelt to champion conservation.

North Dakota’s excellent economy makes it a prime state to start a business. So just what do you have to do to start a company in the state? And how do you form a limited liability company or incorporate in North Dakota?

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Member-Managed LLCs Versus Manager-Managed LLCs

Traditionally, Limited Liability Companies are treated like partnerships. Two or more people get together, found a company, form an LLC, and then start running the business. But there’s more than one way to run an LLC. Member-Managed and Manager-Managed Limited Liability Companies are run very similarly, but there are also some key differences that anyone looking to form an LLC should know.Limited Liability Company

Member-Managed LLCs

Member-Managed LLCs are, by far, the more common choice. Each member of the limited liability company is treated as equal to every other member, and everyone shares responsibility for the day-to-day operation of the LLC. Continue reading

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Business Basics: The Single Member LLC

Limited Liability Companies were, originally, meant to be a replacement for the standard partnership. In 1977, the IRS ruled that it would treat the very first LLC, a Wyoming-based oil company, as a partnership for tax purposes. That meant any money earned by the company would flow through it, directly to the members of the LLC. It wasn’t until 1988, however, that the IRS chose to recognize all LLCs as partnerships, rather than corporations. LLCs are thus, at the federal level, treated as partnerships, which complicates matters for Single Member LLCs. Single Member Limited Liability Companies thus face challenges unique to its business structure – challenges that anyone considering forming a SMLLC should know about and expect.

Single Member LLC

What are the differences between a Limited Liability Company and a Single Member LLC?

The main difference is right in the name. A single member LLC only has one member, or owner. Limited Liability Companies were primarily created to protect the interests of everyone involved in running the company. The assets and debts of the company were its own, and the assets and debts of each member was their own. If one member misbehaved and owed creditors money, the creditor could not seize control of the LLC – they could only collect on the proportional share being paid to that owner. Likewise, if the company went bankrupt, the personal assets of the members were safe. Single Member LLCs, on the other hand, are not partnerships and it has been up to the state courts to decide how much protection a single-member LLC should really provide.

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50 States of Incorporation: New Mexico

This week we’re covering the Land of Enchantment – New Mexico! Though admitted to the union in 1912, New Mexico has, for centuries, been home to the native Navajo, Pueblo, and Apache people. With the fourth-largest native population in the United States, New Mexico continues to be an important center of Native American culture. This culture, along with New Mexico’s stunning natural beauty, are the two of the main drivers of one the state’s biggest industries – tourism.

Along with tourism, New Mexico has a rich deposit of fossil fuel and natural gas, and is home to multiple military bases. In fact, federal spending is one of the biggest sources of revenue for New Mexico. The government of New Mexico is always looking for ways to help small businesses grow, and there are loads of tax incentives available to entrepreneurs in the state! But what does it take to start a small business there? How do you form an LLC or incorporate in New Mexico? And are there any special rules you should be aware of?Incorporate in New Mexico

What is needed to start your small business in New Mexico?

Anyone that does business in New Mexico has to register with the New Mexico Taxation and Revenue Department, and be issued a CRS Identification number. Your CRS number is used to collect and pay tax on gross receipts. In addition to registering, all new small businesses should apply for a ‘Doing Business As’ name with the Secretary of State’s office so that they can advertise, collect checks, and open a bank account under their business’s name. If you’d like, we are happy to run a free DBA name search on your behalf!

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Business Basics: Limited Liability Partnership

A Limited Liability Partnership is a very interesting type of business structure. Limited Liability Companies already combine the ease of running a partnership with the protection of a corporation, and the IRS originally ruled that LLCs would be taxed as partnerships. So what is the difference between a Limited Liability Partnership and a Limited Liability Company? And which one would be the best structure for your company?Limited Liability Partnership

What is a Limited Liability Partnership (LLP)?

We’ll answer the easiest question first. An LLP is very similar to an LLC – both protect the company’s owners from lawsuits and debtors, and both have a pass-through tax structure, meaning anything the company earns passes through it, directly to the owners, without being subject to any corporate income tax. However, a Limited Liability Partnership offers an extra bit of liability protection to each partner. So, just like in a Professional Corporation, the other partners in an LLP will not necessarily be liable for the consequences stemming from another partner’s actions.

Do all states recognize LLPs?

Yes, though the laws recognizing LLPs vary from state to state. The majority of the states have adopted the Revised Uniform Partnership Act, which includes a provision for LLPs stating ‘An obligation of a partnership incurred while the partnership is a limited liability partnership, whether arising in contract, tort, or otherwise, is solely the obligation of the partnership.’ In layman’s terms, that essentially means that the company, and not the individual partners, is responsible for any obligations stemming from contracts or torts. The states that haven’t adopted the RUPA instead opted for their own laws to recognize LLPs, but all follow the same basic pattern.

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50 States of Incorporation: New Jersey

Incorporate in New JerseyWe’re headed to the shore for this week’s 50 States – New Jersey is the name of the incorporation game!

New Jersey, bordered by New York, Pennsylvania, Delaware and the Atlantic Ocean, is not only home to the infamous “Jersey Shore” (both as the MTV series and popular vacation destination) but also to the second wealthiest Americans in the United States. It has a population of about 8,881,700 naming it the 11th most populous of the states.

According to Forbes, Jersey’s economy is strongly run by pharmaceuticals, financial services, telecommunications, food processing and tourism. Corporations including Pinnacle Foods, Trump Entertainment Resorts, and Kent International all call the state home to their branding headquarters.

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