Business Basics: Delayed Filings

Delayed FilingDelayed filings aren’t the most popular business-related topic, but pursuing a delayed filing can actually be very beneficial to a new small business. When you opt for a delayed filing, you essentially put your business’s paperwork on hold. So if you, for example, have decided to form an LLC, you can actually ask the state to not start the approval process until later in the year. And while it may seem counterintuitive to ask the state to sit on your paperwork, and effectively put your business plans on hold, delayed filings can save you a bit of money and time when it comes to your start-up.

Money saved

‘Nothing is certain in life but death and taxes,’ and the minute your business springs to life, you are liable for all sorts of taxes and fees. If you opt to start your business before the end of 2013, you’ll have to collect, report, and pay taxes for 2013, even though your business was around for less than a month. Delaying recognition also means you could avoid the annual reporting fee for your state for 2013, possibly saving you hundreds of dollars.

Time saved

January is one of the busiest months for government agencies. It is when they begin to work their way through the backlog of paperwork that inevitably accumulates at the end of the year, and year after year I’ve received notices from state agencies all across America regarding a backlog that won’t be surmounted for weeks. A delayed filing will, however, help you avoid that backlog because most states place delayed filings in a priority queue. So after all of the time-critical filings are handled, the state moves directly into approving delayed filings. By opting for a delayed filing, you can avail of all of the benefits of filing in the new year, and avoid the January rush.

Should you opt for a delayed filing?

It really depends on the needs of your business. I’ve always recommended forming a Limited Liability Company or incorporating as soon as possible but, when you do so at the very end of the year, you could get stuck paying annual taxes and fees for the right to operate your business in December. Every state is different, but most will allow you to push your filing date at least thirty days into the future. If you expect your business to be around for a while, and I certainly hope you do, choosing a delayed filing will simply mean operating as a sole proprietorship for one more month before the protection of an LLC or Corporation kick in. If you want to save some time, and possibly quite a bit of money, consider a delayed filing when sending your paperwork into the state.

Would you like to learn more about delayed filings? Or are you ready to form your own LLC or Corporation? Give us a call at 1-877-692-6772 and we’ll be more than happy to help you out!