Which States Are The Best To Live In When It Comes To Taxes?

Although federal taxes are not dependent upon where you live in the United States, there are some drastic differences between how states collect taxes from their citizens – considering the different rates they tax for income, property, luxury goods, and even common necessities such as food and clothing. If you have flexibility about where you live, perhaps it is worth it to move to a state with lower taxation rates in categories that apply to you and your family.

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S Corporations: How They are Structured and Taxed

By Greg Lindberg, 1800Accountant.com Writer

Decision-making is a huge part of being an entrepreneur and, eventually, a start-up business owner. One of the decisions you have to make during this often challenging process is to settle on a specific business entity to operate. An S corporation is one option you can go with. 1800Accountant.com, a partner of MyCorporation, recommends understanding the following information about how S corporations are structured and taxed before choosing to set one up.

The term “S corporation” originally took on its name from Subchapter S of Chapter 1 in the federal Internal Revenue Code. In general, an S corporation does not pay federal income taxes at the corporate level. However, this does not mean it is exempt from paying taxes altogether. The difference with this type of business entity is that it elects to have its profits, losses, deductions, credit, and all other activities passed through to the shareholders who are invested in the company. These shareholders must report this financial activity on their personal income tax returns.
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Do You Owe This Misunderstood Tax? (Hint: The Answer is Probably Yes)

This guest post is brought to you by Outright.com, the alternative to Mint for business and simplest way to manage your small business finances online. Sign up today for a less taxing quarterly estimated tax time!

You’ve jumped through what seems like countless hoops to get your business going. You’ve filled out every form and talked to all the right people. You did all the research and learned from others’ past mistakes. Now it’s just a matter of getting it all done.

Of course this is easier said than done. There are a million things you have to do as a business owner you never dreamed about as a salary or wage worker. Aside from your usual business matters you must now attend to you have to worry about dealing with taxes.
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Mega Millions for All!

If you haven’t heard- the 42 state lotto, Mega Millions is over half a billion dollars. Since we’re finishing out tax season we thought it would be good to highlight one last tax post. We’ll discuss the taxes on your lotto winnings, as well as gross income generally.

If you are from New Hampshire, Tennessee, Texas, South Dakota, Washington, California, Pennsylvania or Delaware you will win the biggest in tonight’s drawing- winning between 3% and 9% more than if you were from any other state because you won’t have to pay state income taxes. However, all winners must count the winnings as income and are subject to the Federal income tax of 35% (or maybe more depending on your specific situation). Continue reading

S-Corporation 101: What you need to know

With the tax season upon us, we’d like to help shed some light on tax issues. Every Friday for the next several weeks we will discuss how the following tax considerations apply to different business entities. (Look for the little piggies!)  The considerations are:

  1. 1. Pass through of gains
  2. 2. Pass through of losses
  3. 3. Transfer of assets to the entity, and
  4. 4. Transfer of assets from the entity

This week we’re going to cover the S-corporation.

What is an S-corp?

For starters, an S-corporation starts just like a normal C-corporation. The letters (S & C) are designations from subchapters of the IRS code. Most corporations are C corporations. An S corporation is a corporation that has made a special election to be taxed in a certain way. Because of this special treatment, there are additional rules and restrictions on top of the standard corporate law requirements. Continue reading