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Experts Weigh In: What Are Your Predictions for 2016?

We’re a couple weeks into 2016, and we’re already starting to see some trends form. In our industry specifically, we’ve been noticing the following:

1.We are seeing a growth in small business s-corporation elections to minimize the risk of audit and put owners of the business on payroll to save on potential employment taxes. This is a trend because as small businesses incur more expenses (increasing minimum wages in many states, health care costs and the cost of employees), they are looking for ways to save on taxes.  Business owners who put themselves on form an s-corporation and put themselves on payroll are able to save on self-employment taxes because they only pay self-employment taxes on the salaried portion of their income (as long as the salary is reasonable) and not on the remainder of the income.  (more…)

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Business Basics: Should You Opt for a Delayed Filing?

Procrastination tends to hit business owners hard when it comes to incorporating or forming an LLC. A lot of small business owners resolve to file the necessary paperwork, and then never do. And now they’re facing the end of another year and wondering if it’s even worth filing this late in the game. Believe it or not, it is! But around this time of the year, we usually tell customers to consider a delayed filing over a traditional, immediate action. Delayed filings are the perfect option for businesses owners who know…

They want to form an LLC or Corporation

Forming a limited liability company or incorporating is easily on of the best ways to protect yourself and your personal assets from any debts associated with the business. The government treats corporations and LLCs as their own legal entities, separate from the owner or owners. Any debts it incurs, loans it takes out, or judgments against it are therefore its responsibility and, in most cases, your personal assets will not be seized to pay for those debts. However, forming an LLC or incorporating requires the company’s managers to jump through a few extra loopholes, like paying fees and filing reports annually. Incorporate or form an LLC now, and you may be on the hook for 2015’s fees, even though the company only existed for a month. Plus, depending on your state, you may have to file different returns for the months your business was not its own entity, and the month it was.

That’s where delayed filing comes in. A delayed filing allows you to file the proper paperwork now, and set an “effective on” date a month or so into the future. That way you finish out this year as a sole proprietorship or partnership and, early next year, your LLC or Incorporation is officially approved and formed.

They do not want to be rushed

There is a lot of work that needs to be done at the end of the year. You have to put your books in order, evaluate the staff, and make it through the holiday season. But forming a legal business entity comes with its fair share of responsibilities as well; if you rush through your paperwork, and anything is amiss, the state will reject your filing. We are right at the cusp of December, so take this brief bit of time to make sure your ducks are all in a row – you have a registered agent, a physical address, and a protected DBA name – and then fill out your forms and opt for a delayed filing. That way you won’t have to struggle through all of the normal, extra work that comes in December and January.

They don’t mind waiting a little bit

I know how frustrating it can be to wait on the government to approve your paperwork, but trust me, patience pays off. You actually save a bit of time filing now and opting for a delayed filing instead of filing at the beginning of next year because a lot of businesses wait until the start of the year to send in their forms. State offices get swamped, the delay gets longer, and then you’re stuck waiting until February or March to hear whether your LLC or Corporation was formed. A delayed filing means your paperwork is approved before that rush or, at the very least, that the state will put your paperwork at the top of next year’s pile.

Ready to form an LLC or Corporation? Want us to help you file the right paperwork or opt for a delayed filing? Click here or give us a call at 1-877-692-6772

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Business Basics: What does it mean to qualify as a Foreign Corporation?

In this week’s Business Basics we’re going over what it means to qualify as a foreign corporation. Let’s say you form a corporation or LLC in one state, but you’ll be doing business in another state. This is pretty common for a lot of business owners. All it means is that you may be required to qualify for a foreign qualification. Filing a foreign qualification allows you to legally operate your business in another state other than the state of formation.  (more…)

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How Your Business Structure Can Impact Your Business Taxes

There’s nothing simple about starting and owning a business. Choices are everywhere — in business plans, company names, pricing, employees, benefits and office space. But first, in order to register your company with state and federal agencies, you’ll need to choose a business structure, and this choice can have ramifications that are not immediately clear.

A business’s structure is basically the way it’s organized. It answers questions like who’s in charge, how profits will be distributed and whether owners are responsible for debts accrued by the business. The most common IRS-recognized business structures include the following: (more…)

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MyCorp FAQs: Do I Need an Employer Identification Number?

An Employer Identification Number, also called an EIN or a Federal Tax Identification Number , is a unique set of digits assigned to a business by the IRS. With it, tax agencies can easily track the financial activity of your company, and make sure that you pay your taxes. employer identification numberBut, if you run a sole-proprietorship, the IRS can already do that using your personal social security number. So in what cases do you need an Employer Identification Number?

When you hire someone

The only time you can really get away with using your social security number is when your business is considered a sole-proprietorship, and you’re the only employee. The IRS figures, in cases like that, the company’s profit flows directly to you, and you pay your taxes from that. But that changes the minute you bring anyone on to help run the company, and that includes a business partner. Once you start hiring, your company must have an EIN.

When you form an LLC or Incorporate

Incorporating or forming an LLC separates you and the business. (more…)

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Start Your Business Today for Half-Off

shutterstock_134435315_smallApril 15th isn’t anyone’s favorite day; tax day typically brings on a feeling of dread, but we wanted to give you something to look forward to this year! In honor of tax day, we are offering our basic package for half the price. That means you get the formation of an LLC or Corporation, normally priced at $69, for half the price!

Whether you’ve been thinking about starting a business for as long as you can remember or have only recently begun tossing around the idea, now is your chance!

All you need is the code: TAXDAYDEAL

Give us a call at 1-877-692-6772, or visit our website at www.MyCorporation.com to start your business today!

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MyCorp FAQs: What are the fastest filing states?

TimeUp next in our MyCorp FAQs series is “What are the fastest states?” It’s a question our customer service department receives on a regular basis. We get it, sometimes entrepreneurs are just very excited to get the ball rolling, and, other times, they find themselves in a desperate time crunch.

Though, like we’ve mentioned before, a lot goes into picking the correct state for the formation of your business, knowing which states file the quickest can help you make an educated, calculated decision. (more…)

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MyCorp FAQs: Should I file in a state with no income tax?

This is easily one of the most commonly asked questions we get. Each state has different rules and regulations when it comes to income tax. Most have both, some don’t collect personal income tax, and a few don’t college corporate income tax. And to a new business owner forming a corporation, forming in a state without a corporate income tax might sound awesome! income taxAfter all, who likes paying taxes?

Unfortunately, things aren’t that cut and dry, and there are good reasons why so many business owners opt to stay in the state that they do business.

You can form a corporation in another state

(more…)

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