Experts Weigh In: Forming LLCs vs. Corporations

llcs vs corporationsOne of the first decisions every business owner needs to make is what entity to file their business as, and that choice is typically between LLCs vs. Corporations. Really the decision comes down to what fits the needs of the business owner and the business, but there is still discussion on which entity is best. Here at MyCorp, we gathered together a panel of professionals to get their expert advice on LLCs vs. Corporations and which is the best to form for your business. Which side are you on?

1. “Generally speaking, corporate status is preferable. Banks typically don’t view LLCs as favorably during the loan application process and corporations don’t pay taxes on fringe benefits. These include group-term life insurance, medical reimbursement plans, medical insurance premiums, and more.”

- John Boyd, Principal, The Boyd Company, Inc.

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50 States of Incorporation: Hawaii

This week, we’re Aloha State bound in our 50 States of Incorporation series with a look at the only U.S. state made up entirely of islands, Hawaii! The 8th smallest state that is also not within the Contiguous United States, Hawaii may look like small on the surface but actually boasts a population of over a million permanent residents within the state. With tropical weather and scenery year round, public beaches and active volcanoes, Hawaii also serves as a popular destination spot for surfers, tourists, and members of the U.S. military.

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S Corporations: How They are Structured and Taxed

By Greg Lindberg, 1800Accountant.com Writer

Decision-making is a huge part of being an entrepreneur and, eventually, a start-up business owner. One of the decisions you have to make during this often challenging process is to settle on a specific business entity to operate. An S corporation is one option you can go with. 1800Accountant.com, a partner of MyCorporation, recommends understanding the following information about how S corporations are structured and taxed before choosing to set one up.

The term “S corporation” originally took on its name from Subchapter S of Chapter 1 in the federal Internal Revenue Code. In general, an S corporation does not pay federal income taxes at the corporate level. However, this does not mean it is exempt from paying taxes altogether. The difference with this type of business entity is that it elects to have its profits, losses, deductions, credit, and all other activities passed through to the shareholders who are invested in the company. These shareholders must report this financial activity on their personal income tax returns.
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