Business Basics: Professional Corporations

Welcome to our weekly business basics post! This week we decided to explore a specialized legal entity called a professional corporation (PC). Now most of those who know a little bit about corporate law probably know that there are two, main types of corporations – S-Corps, and C-Corps. But in addition to these, there are a few other specialized structures that are important to keep under the belt of a small business, like the professional corporation.

So what is a professional corporation?
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MyCorp Presents: Notable Changes in 2013 Tax Law

What taxes will go up and what kinds of tax breaks for small business can you expect to see extended in 2013? We did the legwork for you today on notable changes you can expect to see for 2013′s tax law.

For some, Income Taxes will go up in 2013 – Small businesses that have a pass through structure – an LLC, S-Corp, Partnership, or Sole Proprietorship – may be affected by the increase in income tax as whatever profits the business takes in translates into their income. However, this will only affect those in the highest income bracket.

  • If you are single and make more than $400k a year, or married and make more than $450k, you will be subject to a rather large tax rate increase from 35% to 39.6%. All other income brackets will be taxed at previous, Bush-era tax rates. Continue reading

LLC 101

If you’ve been following our blog for the past couple of Fridays, you know that we’re covering four basic tax tips to consider when forming a new entity. If you missed the first two, read up on the C-Corporation and S-Corporation.

The four considerations we’ve been covering are:

  1. Pass through of gains
  2. Pass through of losses
  3. Transfer of assets to the entity, and
  4. Transfer of assets from the entity Continue reading

S-Corporation 101: What you need to know

With the tax season upon us, we’d like to help shed some light on tax issues. Every Friday for the next several weeks we will discuss how the following tax considerations apply to different business entities. (Look for the little piggies!)  The considerations are:

  1. 1. Pass through of gains
  2. 2. Pass through of losses
  3. 3. Transfer of assets to the entity, and
  4. 4. Transfer of assets from the entity

This week we’re going to cover the S-corporation.

What is an S-corp?

For starters, an S-corporation starts just like a normal C-corporation. The letters (S & C) are designations from subchapters of the IRS code. Most corporations are C corporations. An S corporation is a corporation that has made a special election to be taxed in a certain way. Because of this special treatment, there are additional rules and restrictions on top of the standard corporate law requirements. Continue reading

S-Corp Election

There are many people who consider S-Corporation election when forming their new corporation.  An S-Corporation offers both advantages and disadvantages that regular C-Corporations do not, and may be beneficial depending on what type of business you run and how you would like to run that business.  S-Corporations operate similarly to regular corporations, but are taxed in a manner that is similar to a Limited Liability Company.

For example, the main difference between an S-Corporation and a regular C-Corporation is that the profits and losses of the S-Corporation are passed on to the various shareholders in the corporation.  The shareholders are then taxed on their individual share of the corporation’s profits or losses and report this on their individual tax returns. Continue reading