The 4 Best Ways To Secure Funding For Your Small Business

Start ups don’t grow on trees. If you’re looking to launch a successful company then you’re probably going to be responsible for most of the growth yourself. But there is certainly more than one way you can raise the cash to get your business off the ground. Whether you already have a wealthy financier ready to inject cash into your project or need to secure money from more personal links, there are plenty of opportunities for funding. (more…)


Starting a Business Debt-free: Benefits of Using 401(k) Business Financing

When it comes to small business financing options, it’s usually traditional funding methods that come to mind: working capital loans, SBA loans, business lines of credit, etc. But did you know an alternative option exists that’s allowed thousands of entrepreneurs to launch businesses debt-free? It’s called a Rollover for Business Start-up (ROBS), and it enables you to leverage your own retirement assets to buy a business without having to pay any tax penalties or get a loan. (more…)


Your Small Business Finance Timeline

They say timing is everything, and nowhere is that phrase truer than in the world of small business — especially when it comes to business financing. If you’re relying on some type of funding to get your business off the ground, your opening date is completely dependent on when you’re able to secure start-up capital. So before you commit to a deadline, make sure your expectations are realistic by understanding the small business financing timeline: (more…)


Funding to Jumpstart Your Business Idea

For entrepreneurs in all stages of the business lifecycle, finding funding to jumpstart your business is an integral part of the journey. Not having access to enough capital can quickly derail even the most well laid-out plans, and it’s a problem many entrepreneurs still face, in spite of improving consumer and business confidence. According to the Federal Reserve’s Joint Small Business Credit Survey, 50 percent of small businesses received none of the financing they had applied for in the first half of 2014. (more…)


6 Tips for Creating a Great Business Plan

Copy of Job InterviewWhatever the aims for your business might be, there is a good chance that at some stage you will need to draw up a clear plan for its progress. The process of creating a business plan can be hard work but it  serves a variety of important functions, especially when it comes to potentially attracting the financing that small companies so badly need in order to get started.

With that in mind, here are 6 tips for getting it right when it comes to building a great business plan. (more…)


ABCs of Small Business Industry: V is for Venture Capital

reasonable compensationWe’re getting down to the bottom here at our small business industry series. Today’s letter is ‘V’ is for venture capital!

First of all, what is venture capital?

Venture capital businesses give funding to early, high-potential, start up businesses. These businesses make their money by owning equity in the companies that they invest in, which usually have a novel technology or business model in high technology industries, like IT or biotechnology. The typical venture capital investment occurs after the seed funding round as the first round of institutional capital to fund growth in the interest of generating a return through an eventual realization event (like a trade sale of the company).   (more…)


How Quick Business Loans Can Encourage Business Turnaround

How Quick Business Loans Can Encourage Business TurnaroundIf you need quick business loans to help you out of a short-term cash flow crisis, what you don’t need is hassle when making these loan arrangements. We know all too well that any delay in making those funds available can lead to an operational headache, or threaten the survival of your business.

Reasons you may need a quick business loan

There could be an unexpected interruption in sales such as a delay in the delivery of stock that slows the flow of money coming into the business. It could be that you need quick business loans to pay for expensive new equipment or machinery in order to maintain production or cope with a sudden increase in demand. In difficult trading conditions, the customer has also become savvier, and more reluctant to make an immediate purchase, if they even make a purchase at all. As a result the retailer is late in paying you, the distributor. They, in turn, seek extended payment terms in order to assist their own cash flow. Suddenly, your usually strict 30 days terms of credit are being extended to 45 days or even 60 days. You will be paid, eventually, but later than you were expecting.

A short term business loan does not always have to be used to plug cash flow; it can be used as a tool to speed up business turnaround. Taking the right loan at the right time can be a great tactic to help you take advantage of business opportunities that come your way. The speed in which you can secure funding may determine how quickly you can push out in front of your competition or equally ensure your business does not plummet further into uncontrollable cash flow problems.



Go Against the Crowd: Friends & Family Funding Advice from TrustLeaf

Go Against the Crowd: Friends & Family Funding Advice from TrustLeaf
Photo credit: Silicon Valley Business Journal

Everyone has been talking about crowdfunding lately, but what about momfunding? Or friendfunding? Earlier this week, family loans site TrustLeaf released their first guide on “How to Borrow Money from Friends and Family.” For any small business owner who’s done this kind of loan before, the value of doing it right cannot be understated.

Unlike crowdfunding, where entrepreneurs ask for donations from strangers (sometimes with a gift in return) TrustLeaf helps small business owners raise money through their existing social and family network. “Crowdfunding is great if you have a sleek prototype or a chic new fashion line, but doesn’t make as much sense for say, an auto repair shop.” says Anson Liang, TrustLeaf’s founder.

38% of all US small businesses start out with friends and family loans; on average, borrowing $25,000. Compare that with popular crowdfunding site Indiegogo, which only brings in about $1,000 on average per campaign. Kickstarter performs better, but the vast majority of campaigns raise less than $10,000, which in turn is less than half of friends and family loans on average.



How Fundable is Your Business?

How Fundable is Your Business?Fund • a • bil • i • ty – [adj. Fuhnd-uh-bil-i-tee]

You won’t find “Fundability” on, so don’t bother looking. Fundability is a phrase we’ve coined to describe how a business measures up in relation to the entire business lending and investing community.

All joking aside, how “Fundable” is your business?

Fundability is not just about your credit. It includes several components that determine how your overall business is seen by lenders, investors, insurers, suppliers, and more. Basically, we know that your business was worth the risk for you, but is it worth the risk for them?



5 Things to Know About Financing Your First Startup

5 Things to Know About Financing Your First StartupBy David Nilssen, Co-founder & CEO, Guidant Financial

If your goal for 2014 is to become a business owner, you’re most likely being inundated with advice and tips. Maybe so much that sifting through it and evaluating who you can trust is eating up time that would be better spent putting the wheels in motion for your new venture. In the interest of saving you time and aggravation, I’ve broken down the five most important things you should know about getting the funds squared away for your business:

1) Pre-empt your lender’s doubts.
If you’re seeking a loan to purchase a franchise, your bank may be well-versed in franchising—or not. Assume they will need convincing about the franchise and do their homework for them: a risk evaluation using banking terminology and analyzing standard underwriting topics. A FRANdata bank credit report in hand will smooth your path with lenders.

2) Get your financial records in shape.
That means get them together in one place in a condition that makes it clear that you are trustworthy, keep meticulous records and are a serious professional. The bank is going to want to see:

  • Personal and business credit history
  • Personal and business financial statements for existing and startup businesses and as well as a projected financial statements
  • A strong, detailed business plan (including personal information such as bios, education, etc.)
  • Cash flow projections for at least a year

3) Realize that your payment history is important.
There’s no question that your credit score is important, but banks will also look at your back payment history. If it concerns them, it could dilute the weight given even a strong credit score.

4) Make sure your resume reflects your business acumen.

Even if you’ve never owned a business before, highlight the experience you do have to show lenders that you have knowledge of the space you’re entering, that you finish what you start, that you have membership in organizations that are relevant to your new business.

5) Keep calm and carry on.

It’s become an internet meme, but it’s relevant here. Be patient and move forward with plans as best you can while awaiting a decision from the lender. If you get a ‘no,’ move on. Successful business owners know that it’s all about the long game.

Of course there are alternative ways to fund a business. If you’ve got a 401(k), there is a rather complex, but completely legal way to use the retirement account to purchase a business—without incurring any debt.

David Nilssen is the CEO & Co-Founder of Guidant Financial. Read more tips about becoming a successful entrepreneur in his book, Making the Jump into Small Business Ownership. He can be found on Twitter at @DavidNilssen.