6 Easy Fraud Prevention Tips Every Business Should be Practicing

4 Creative Cost Reduction Tips for StartupsFraud has become a major concern for many businesses all over the world. Scammers have made millions of dollars by simply stealing information such as credit card numbers, passwords and banking details from companies. Business and consumers engaging in online transactions are especially at risk when it comes to fraud and identity theft. It’s so important for businesses to take measures to lower their chances of falling victim to scammers. Business fraud prevention doesn’t have to be huge, scary ordeal. Continue reading

5 Reasons Why Your Company Credit Rating Matters

How Quick Business Loans Can Encourage Business TurnaroundA company credit rating works in much the same way as an individual credit rating. So it provides information on how your company has handled its finances in the past with the aim of offering an insight into how it and you are likely to manage money in the future.

A company credit rating isn’t designed to be absolutely definitive or unchanging but it is important to have it in mind as an organisation of any size because its impact and relevance can be wide-reaching. Continue reading

Announcing our New Partnership with Paychex!

MyCorporation has spent the last fifteen years working tirelessly to help entrepreneurs realize their dreams and start their own businesses. Our mission has always been to make the lives of small business owners just a little bit easier. And it is with that mission in mind that we are proud to announce our new partnership with Paycheck Accounting Online℠!

payroll services

Paychex

Since its founding in 1971, Paychex has been a proven leader in payroll outsourcing, and today Paychex helps over half-a-million businesses to easily monitor and handle payroll, benefits, and human resources.

And now MyCorporation customers can start using Paychex for only $4.99/month for the first 3 months, with the rate increasing to a mere $19/month after that. All you have to do is sign up through this page and complete your business profile, and Paychex will start helping you handle your payroll, allowing you to focus on what you do best – running your business.

We are really excited for this partnership, and know our clients will love working with Paychex.

Six Solid Ways to Generate Leads Online and Offline

Man holding tablet pc and credit card indoor, Shopping onlineLead generation can be one of the most frustrating parts of having a business. Finding the key to what gets people to click on your site, or visit your storefront, is a feat not easily mastered by any business owner. To help ease that frustration, and get the ball rolling, here are six solid ways to generate leads both online and offline: Continue reading

Experts Weigh In: What did you sacrifice to start your small business?

20 Ways to Kick Stress to the Curb and Have Fun with Your StartupEvery small business owner needs to make some sacrifices to start the business of their dreams. Luckily, as most entrepreneurs will tell you, the things that you give up often have a way of finding their way back to you once your business finds its groove.

From time, to money, to missing their own wedding party, these 45 small business experts let us in on what they had to give up to get where they are today.  Continue reading

How to Crowdfund Legally

Limited Liability PartnershipStarting a new business is an exciting venture! That is, until the realization of just how much money you will need takes you down a few notches. Before you get too discouraged, know that you have several options available to you.

One of those options is crowdfunding. Crowdfunding is the process of raising small amounts of money from a large amount of people- this can be with the help of friends and family as well as people you don’t know. If you approach it correctly, attracting crowdfunding investors can be just what you need to get your business up and running, as long as you’re careful.

Now, the safest way to go about something that has potential legal implications is to know exactly what is allowed and what isn’t. Law enforcement has never taken “I didn’t know I was doing something wrong!” as a valid excuse.

So what should I steer clear of when crowdfunding? 

Promising Ownership

According to Biz Journals, a crowd funder may receive a reward for their donation once the company is up and running, but they cannot claim any ownership or financial gain in the business. For example, would-be authors can promise crowd fund investors copies of their signed books or acknowledgements for donations, but business owners can’t exchange equity for investments.

If you want to give away equity in exchange for funds, you need to work with accredited investors—people who make over $200,000 and have over $1 million in assets.

Forgetting about Taxes

The funds you get from your crowdfunding efforts are considered taxable income. Don’t forget that you must follow the federal and state tax laws you are subject to. If you plan to go the crowdfunding route, calculate taxes into your financial goals.

Breaking Promises

The typical crowdfunding effort is set up in a way that the person asking for funding promises rewards (not equity) to people who invest. Some crowdfunding sites use an all-or-nothing system where if a person reaches their goal, they keep the funding and must follow through on their promises. If they don’t reach their goal, the money goes back to the investors.

If you reach your goal and fail to follow through with your promised incentives, you could be considered in breach of contract. Unless you want to face a class-action lawsuit, follow through on any promises made during the crowdfunding process.

Where should I look for funding?

If you want to start a company or dive into a project that needs funding, sites like KickStarter or IndieGogo are useful mediums for making money. These have been especially great resources for artistic projects, such as publishing a book, starting a food truck, creating an art exhibit, or designing a new product.

Are there any other rules to keep in mind?

Crowdfunding is subject to rules placed by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act- these rules are under constant discussion. As seen on Forbes, here are the rules you must follow if you plan on utilizing crowdfunding for your startup:

  • You can only accept up to $1 million dollars per 12-month period through crowdfunding.
  • If you are starting an investment company or a public-reporting company, you cannot use crowdfunding.
  • Crowdfund investors are only allowed to give a certain amount of money during a 12-month period. For investors who make over $100,000/yr., they can only give 10% of their income or net worth. For those who make less than $100,000/yr., they can only give up to 5% of their income (or up to $2,000, depending on which is greater).
  • You can only find crowdfunding through registered broker-dealers or “funding portals.”
  • You cannot advertise except to direct potential investors to your broker or funding portal.
  • If you complete a crowdfunding crowd, make sure you file the correct reports with the SEC.

The laws surrounding crowdfunding and business startups are complicated. To be absolutely sure you don’t cross any legal lines, talk to a lawyer who works with business law.

Originally from San Jose, California, Erika Remmington is a recent graduate of the University of California, Berkeley in linguistics with a minor in business administration. She enjoys spending her time with her husband and 18 month old daughter. She also enjoys rock climbing and outdoor activities. Legal information from this article was provided by Kitchen Simeson Belliveau Llp.

Business Basics: What to Consider When Deciding Which State to File in

Foreign CorporationWhen it comes to opening your very own small business, you have a lot of decisions to make. What’s your logo going to look like, how many employees are you going to hire, have any initial marketing ideas? And on top of all that, maybe the biggest decision of all, is deciding which state to file in. You can go one of two ways with this: file in the state you’re physically located in, or file in another state. There are advantages and disadvantages to both. Ultimately, the decision should be specific to each business because, depending on the states you’re considering, and your industry, one option may be more expensive than the other.

So when it comes down to it, be sure to consider these three factors when deciding where to file your business!

 The cost of foreign qualifying.

If you choose to file your business in a state other than the one you reside in, you’ll have to go through the process of filing for a foreign qualification. This is required of any company that wishes to conduct business outside the state lines that the formation was created in. Once you’ve filed the paperwork, you’re legally able to do business in a state that was not your business’s home state. You can, of course, file the paperwork yourself, but many businesses opt for a filing service to file the paperwork for them to ease the process. Our services, personally, start at $149.

The economic health of the prospective states.

The economic health of a state can be different for different industries. Where the automotive industry might be booming in the state you’re looking at, coal mining might not be doing so hot. There are a couple different reliable resources to check up on the health of a state and your specific industry: Forbes has a good list of the best states to do business in that includes the top industries with each state, and our latest series post, ABCs of Small Business Industry is another good place to check up on the health of your industry overall.

The small business friendliness.  

There are some states that are widely recognized as friendly business states- states that are simply huge supporters of small business and entrepreneurship. Delaware, for example, has earned the nickname of “The Incorporation Capital of the World” due to it not having any corporate income tax and maintaining such a modern corporate climate and economic outlook. Check in on your home state’s business friendliness to see if it would make more sense financially, considering taxes and overall fees, to stay in your state or head somewhere else.