How to Turn Your Side Business into a Small Business

How to Turn Your Side Business into a Small BusinessSmall businesses get better tax breaks than hobbyists, reports the Small Business Administration. As a hobbyist, you must pay tax on any income earned from your activities, but are limited in your deductions. When performing an activity with the intent of making a profit, you are considered “in” business.

Hobbyists, go a little further and become a business-in-fact with all of its tax and legal benefits.

Telltale Signs you are Running a (Real) Business

  • Your garage and/or spare bedroom are so full of supplies and inventory that you can’t park your car or find your way to the window.
  • Your sales have grown, along with your need for supplies and related expenses, and you’re making a name for yourself, your products and/or services (branding).
  • Your supplier tells you that to be able to order in larger quantities and to get price breaks, you’ll need a state tax ID number (obtainable only for registered businesses).

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Do Your Taxes Have Bad Breath?

Today, our guest poster Justin Krane offers up a step by step plan on how to stay on top of your taxes and how to avoid putting them off till the last minute. Additionally, you can join Justin and our CEO Deborah for an amazing financial webinar on May 29th at 1PM PST/4PM EST. In this webinar, Justin will teach you how to create high quality goals and the financial strategies to put in place to work towards achieving them. You in? We are! Register by clicking here.

You are trying to back away from them but their stank is just ridic? They have no idea how bad their breath is! Especially when they eat the onion bagel with lox cream cheese! You’ll do anything to avoid their halitosis.

Got me thinking. Do your taxes have bad breath? Your taxes only end up stinking if you put them off till the last minute. It stinks to have no idea how much money you owe the IRS. Give your taxes a breath mint! No more scrambling the last few days before taxes are due. No more tax surprises. No more bad breath.

How you plan your taxes is most likely how you plan your financial life. It’s time to be proactive, not reactive! I want your financial life to be easier for you.
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401ks for Entrepreneurs: What You Need to Know

Starting your own business as an entrepreneur puts you at significant financial and personal risks. However, there is one risk – not saving for retirement – that you don’t have to subject yourself to. Whether you run your business alone or have a few employees at your back, there is a 401k plan available that can help you ensure that your golden years are stress-free.

Sole Proprietors

Just because your business is a one-person operation doesn’t mean you (and your spouse) have to miss out on the benefits of saving for retirement with a 401k account. You can set up an individual 401k (also known as a one-participant or solo- 401k) plan through your bank or another financial institution in order to contribute pre-tax funds into a savings, mutual fund, or money market account of your choosing.
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D is for DBA

For the fourth week of MyCorp ABCs, the letter D gets a spotlight. The term of focus: DBA!

DBA stands for ‘doing business as,’ but the term has also donned the names ‘fictitious business name’ and ‘assumed name.’ A DBA is an official registration of your business name. You would go about filing for a DBA application if your business conducts any business and/or collects money under any name or title that isn’t your own name. DBAs aren’t just for sole proprietors; if you own a Corporation or LLC and want to do business under a name different than your corporate name, you’d have to file for a DBA. Additionally, if you’re plan on opening a business bank account, you’ll need to register for a DBA as a general requirement from the bank. Continue reading

C is for C-Corp

For our third installment of the ABC’s for small business, we decided that we liked the letter “C” so much that it had to stay in our word of choice – literally! C-corps are organization structures for businesses that provide non-tax benefits with profits taxed separately from its owners. Beyond just taxing profits separately, c-corps also have the distinction of being separate entities from their owners entirely in both control and management and as such, may go public and raise investment capital, engage in business, and initiate lawsuits.

Last March we did a post on C-Corp 101 and the four considerations to making your business tax efficient, provided below for a quick recap: Continue reading