Deborah Sweeney

Author Biography

is the CEO of MyCorporation.com. MyCorporation is a leader in online legal filing services for entrepreneurs and businesses, providing start-up bundles that include corporation and LLC formation, registered agent, DBA, and trademark & copyright filing services. MyCorporation does all the work, making the business formation and maintenance quick and painless, so business owners can focus on what they do best.

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http://www.mycorporation.com/

It’s in the Mail: What Your Brand’s Packaging is Telling Consumer

In my recent infatuation with a startup software company, I discovered their new venture into creating physical products. Across all the products, the design was simple, utilitarian, yet sexy. Obviously, I was in love and quickly placed an order.

When I received the product in the flesh, I believed there had been a mix-up at the post office. The plain, brown packaging soiled the joy of finding the attractive product inside. Although I certainly loved the product, there was a certain injustice done to the beauty of the product and, ultimately, the brand.

Oftentimes people forget that the first experience a consumer has with the brand isn’t actually the product, it’s what holds it- which is why your brand’s packaging is so important. As much as we all try not to judge a book by its cover, there is a reason why the saying exists: because we naturally do. When looking at your product, ask only one question: “How will the customer feel?” If the answer isn’t the one you’re looking for, then perhaps it’s time for change.

Here are the two things you need to concentrate on to package the perfect product:

Focus on the Message

If your packaging hasn’t been updated in awhile, there is a good chance that it suffers from information overload. Potential customers today have a new baseline for content attentiveness, one that is much lower than most companies would like. When considering options for a redesign, focus on one core message that should be crystal clear from the packaging. Reducing content allows consumers to immediately connect with the intended message without having to visually search through useless clipart or obvious text.

An added benefit of converting the message into imagery alone not only brings clarity to the product, but makes international appeal a seamless process. Famous brands like Starbucks have already made this adjustment by relying on their logo for universal recognition, rather than having English words limit their brand. Although this approach might feel risky or vague, trust your brand enough to let it draw attraction on its own accord.

Craft the Experience

When Steve Jobs designed the iPhone packaging, some questioned his characteristic obsessive nature as he scrutinized over how fast the bottom would separate from the top cover. While such measures may be extreme, the genius was in crafting the experience for the consumer.

The exhilaration from a purchase doesn’t end with the swipe of a credit card. The joy of something new continues with the unboxing that can only be compared to tearing the wrapping paper off a present. Humans are emotional creatures, and we love presentation as much as we do the item itself. Without it, the overall impression of the brand sours. Take the time to open current products and decide if the packaging presents the item with the magnitude it deserves or if the emotion is underwhelming.

Good design means being simple and honest with the customer. Showcase without overselling, and always keep the message razor focused. Remember that not all consumers are subjected to online content, which means in some cases the package itself is the first and only chance a company gets to make the right impression. However there is a reason why there are guidelines rather than “to do” lists for package design, because not every product needs to come out of an iPhone box. Stay true to emotional impact, and your customers will certainly feel what was intended.

A box is never just a box.

Hilary Smith is an online writer and business journalist from Chicago, Illinois. In addition to covering the many aspects that make a successful brand, her writing also covers entrepreneurship, small business, unified communications, and globalization. Connect with her on Google Plus today.

ABCs of Small Business Industry: C is for Chiropractor

runnerChiropractic practices have been around since the days of ancient Greece. From the beginning, we’ve been manipulating our spines and extending our extremities to relieve back pain. Though as ancient and historical as those methods are, the business aspect of being a chiropractor has changed a little bit over the years.

With today’s Small Business Industry post, we’ll take a closer look at what’s happening with the chiropractic industry right now. Continue reading

Business Basics – Estimated Tax Payments

Estimated tax payments are one of the biggest shocks for new business owners. They know that they have to pay taxes, they just don’t realize they have to send in a check four times a year! Most businesses that expect to more than $1,000 – or $500 if the company is incorporated – in taxes have to make estimated payments to the IRS. And, since the next quarterly payment is due on September 15th, we thought it’d be a good idea to do a quick rundown of what estimated tax payments are.

Estimated Tax Payment

What are estimated tax payments?
Exactly what they sound like. These payments are simply what you’d normally owe on your income. However, since you don’t have an employer to withhold and send in what you owe, you have to do it instead.
Continue reading

ABCs of Small Business Industry: B is for Business Services

This week we are looking at an industry very near and dear to MyCorporation – Business Services! This is a fairly broad industry, but essentially companies in it help other businesses. That could mean filing paperwork, providing tech support, processing data… the list goes on and on. Businesses helping businesses – what could be better? If you’re considering forming your own company in the business services industry, we’re here to help you out!

business services

Where do you start?

Since business services is such a broad category, it’s kind of hard to answer this question. At the very least you need a ‘Doing Business As‘ name, and should consider filing for an Employer Identification Number. You’ll also need to have all your permits and licenses in order. Unfortunately the ones you need really depend on what other industries you fall into. A tech support company, for example, would need different permits and licenses than a remote office administrator service.

Continue reading

Business Basics: What to Consider When Deciding Which State to File in

Foreign CorporationWhen it comes to opening your very own small business, you have a lot of decisions to make. What’s your logo going to look like, how many employees are you going to hire, have any initial marketing ideas? And on top of all that, maybe the biggest decision of all, is deciding which state to file in. You can go one of two ways with this: file in the state you’re physically located in, or file in another state. There are advantages and disadvantages to both. Ultimately, the decision should be specific to each business because, depending on the states you’re considering, and your industry, one option may be more expensive than the other.

So when it comes down to it, be sure to consider these three factors when deciding where to file your business!

 The cost of foreign qualifying.

If you choose to file your business in a state other than the one you reside in, you’ll have to go through the process of filing for a foreign qualification. This is required of any company that wishes to conduct business outside the state lines that the formation was created in. Once you’ve filed the paperwork, you’re legally able to do business in a state that was not your business’s home state. You can, of course, file the paperwork yourself, but many businesses opt for a filing service to file the paperwork for them to ease the process. Our services, personally, start at $149.

The economic health of the prospective states.

The economic health of a state can be different for different industries. Where the automotive industry might be booming in the state you’re looking at, coal mining might not be doing so hot. There are a couple different reliable resources to check up on the health of a state and your specific industry: Forbes has a good list of the best states to do business in that includes the top industries with each state, and our latest series post, ABCs of Small Business Industry is another good place to check up on the health of your industry overall.

The small business friendliness.  

There are some states that are widely recognized as friendly business states- states that are simply huge supporters of small business and entrepreneurship. Delaware, for example, has earned the nickname of “The Incorporation Capital of the World” due to it not having any corporate income tax and maintaining such a modern corporate climate and economic outlook. Check in on your home state’s business friendliness to see if it would make more sense financially, considering taxes and overall fees, to stay in your state or head somewhere else.

Experts Weigh In: How is Your Business Transitioning From Summer to Fall?

Back to SchoolJust as it’s time to take the little ones back to school, it’s time for the adults to “go back to school” in a way as well. The summer is typically a time for fitting in vacation where you can, and taking it a little easier due to the slow season. But with fall quickly approaching, small businesses everywhere are figuring out how to make transitioning from summer to fall as seamless as possible.

We asked our panel of small business experts about how they’re making the transition, and this is what they had to say! Continue reading

ABCs of Small Business Industries: B is for Builders (and General Contracting)

5 Safety Precautions to Practice While Relocating to a New OfficeWe’re onto our next ‘B’ in our “ABCs of Small Business Industries” installment! Today’s ‘B’ is for builders (or,  general contracting)! If you’ve dreamed of construction since you were organizing your building blocks as a young child, now might just be the perfect time for you to make your move. Not sure where to start? We’ll help you out. Continue reading

Business Basics: Return on Investment (ROI)

Welcome back to business basics! In case you’ve forgotten, every week we take a look at a basic business concept in order to try to help new business owners better understand it. This week, we are covering Return on Investment, or ROI – a fairly straightforward, but often misunderstood, part of running a business! Though you may think you know all about ROI, you could be using it incorrectly. But first… ROI

What is ROI?

Return on Investment, or ROI, is pretty easy to grasp – heck, the definition is right in the name. It’s whatever return you get after your invest in some part of your business. So if you hire 2 new salespeople, a basic measurement of ROI will be the money they bring in, minus their wages. Continue reading

ABCs of Small Business Industry: B is for Banking

As we enter week four of our series, we decided to look at a slightly different industry – banking. Now, focusing on banking may seem a bit odd. After all, most people don’t consider banking as something an entrepreneur can even get into. And while there are loads a regulatory loopholes to jump through, plenty of entrepreneurs do start their own bank! And running a bank can be quite lucrative. So if you have experience in the financial industry, and are looking for a change, this could be just the post for you! banking

How do you start a bank?

Like any business, you need to identify a need. Most communities are served by big-name banks like Chase or Bank of America, and people gravitate towards names they recognize. But even if it feels like your community is over saturated with corporate banks, there could be a place for a small, community bank, like if you decide to focus on serving a particular section or area of the community. Some people also like being able to meet face-to-face with a high-level executive to talk about loans or their account – something they’d never be able to do at a corporate bank.

If the market looks good, you then need to work on getting everything organized. Most states require banks to have multiple directors, who then put in an initial offering to get the bank started, usually around 25% of the bank’s starting capital. Since banks need a lot of capital to run, this is usually a substantial amount of money. Most banks sell off shares to raise the rest of their capital.

When your ducks are in a row, you file for a state or federal charter. Filing this form typically costs thousands of dollars, and requires a substantial amount of preparation. You’ll need to include information like feasibility studies, applications for the directors, projected costs, projected salaries – the state or federal government effectively needs to decide whether or not you’ll be successful before granting a charter. After this, you apply for deposit insurance from the FDIC, which requires banks to prove they have enough capital to cover any risk and losses. It will take a few months before the charter application is processed and, once it is approved, you normally have about a year to start the bank officially.

What business structures are best suited for banking?

Because banks are required to have directors, executives, and shareholders, a bank has to be some sort of corporation. However, in some states, a bank is an entity in itself. Though it is run in the same way a standard corporation is.

How stable is the banking industry?

Very. Because banks have to apply for a charter, an outside organization effectively reviews their business plan and target market, and determines whether or not the idea is viable. Banking costs a lot of money, but if you get a charter, you can usually bet that you’ll be successful. The rate at which banks fail has also slowed substantially as the economy has recovered.

Interested in community banking? Have any questions about the banking industry? Leave a comment below, or give us a call at 1-877-692-6772!

Come Hangout with Us on Google+!

Have any questions about starting your own business? Not sure where to even start? Not to worry! We are proud to announce that, in conjunction with the Google Small Business Community, our CEO Deborah Sweeney is going to be fielding any and all questions about the legalities of starting your own business this Thursday. The Hangout starts tomorrow at 12:30 PM, and if you want your questions answered, you’ll need to RSVP and submit them to the moderator here.

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So don’t forget to tune in! We’re really excited about this opportunity, and look forward to a great discussion.